T
Taj For Doctors
Taj For DoctorsTaj Doctor
home

About Us

Taj Brands

Diseases Health Tips  HIV/AIDS News Contact Us

 
flick left flick upper right
menu upper

  All News
  Allergy
  Asthma
  Cardiology
  Clinical Research
  Critical Care
  Dentistry
  Dermatology
  Endocrinology
  Gastroenterology
  General
  Genetics / Biotech
  Men's Health
  Infectious Diseases
  Fitness/Lifestyle
  Nephrology
  Neurology
  Oncology/Haematology
  Ophthalmology
  Orthopaedics
  Otolaryngology
  Paediatrics
  Psychiatry
  Reproductive Health
  Respiratory Medicine
  Surgery
  Sex
  Urology
  Women's Health
menu lower
PRESS News back

The premier health and medical news on the Internet
Shingles pain eased with two-pronged therapy
Last Updated: 2006-07-14 16:08:48 -0400                                     By *****

NEW YORK  - A new approach could bring much-needed relief to people suffering from severe nerve pain following a bout of shingles.
Shingles is caused by reactivation of chickenpox virus, which lies dormant in nerve fibers until stress or illness triggers a resurgence. The resulting rash can damage nerves, causing sometimes-excruciating pain, called postherpetic neuralgia.
Now researchers report in the Archives of Neurology that a course of intravenous treatment with the antiviral drug acyclovir, followed by oral treatment with a similar drug, valacyclovir, helps at least some patients with shingles pain. Dr. Donald H. Gilden and co-investigators at the University of Colorado Health Science Center in Denver studied this strategy in 15 patients with moderate to severe postherpetic neuralgia.
All the patients were older than 50 years of age, had neuralgia for three months or more, and rated their pain as four or higher on a 10-point pain scale. They were given intravenous acyclovir every 8 hours for 14 days followed by oral valacyclovir three times a day for one month.
Eight of the 15 patients reported an improvement of two or more points on the pain scale. Gilden and colleagues explain that a two-point reduction on the rating scale is approximately equal to a 30 percent reduction in pain, and is "clinically meaningful." The treatment was well tolerated, they report.The researchers acknowledge that intravenous acyclovir could be expensive, but the costs might be offset by reductions in the use of other healthcare services.

flick flick right
 
 
 
 
 

         Copyright 2004- 2006 TAJ Pharmaceuticals Limited. All Rights Reserved.

Site Requirements : Internet Explorer 5.0+ or Netscape 5.0+, Flash Player 5.0 & Real Player 8 Basic
To get in touch with us, call on 91-22-2637 4592, 91--22-2637 4593 or fax us at 91-22-2634 1274 

Terms and Conditions | Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Sitemap | Feedback | FAQ